Volume > Issue > The Vision & Future of the NEW OXFORD REVIEW

The Vision & Future of the NEW OXFORD REVIEW

EDITORIAL

By Dale Vree | November 1985

Sometimes I think the New Oxford Re­view, as a serious journal of ideas, is lost in the slick, razzle-dazzle world of the media, and there is no safe niche for us to fit into. I say this for several reasons.

With the rise of movies, television, cassettes, and VCRs, et al., the world of the serious print me­dia almost seems archaic. The rise of the “electron­ic” media, which are so much easier to “consume,” has contributed mightily to a drop in ordinary lit­eracy. And it’s a vicious downward spiral. The de­cline in literacy itself drives people away from the print media, making people ever more dependent on the electronic media.

It is understandable that in this situation many serious magazines have been folding up. The most recent fatality is Worldview, long a friend of the NOR. Of course, the sharply rising postal rates for magazines are accelerating this process.

Many periodicals have tried to adapt. Once-serious magazines change to glossy paper; fill their pages with lots of color photos and pricey ads promising pleasure and success; shrink their book review sections (who reads serious books any­more?); and concentrate on how-to advice (among certain religious periodicals we find everything from lessons on how to dress properly for church to eight painless steps for improving your spiritual­ity). In so adapting, many religious magazines have “survived” — even if survival is purchased at the price of shaving the truth and forgetting the pur­pose for which they were originally founded.

Enjoyed reading this?

READ MORE! REGISTER TODAY

SUBSCRIBE

You May Also Enjoy

Letter to the Editor: April 1998

The Trash That Refreshes?... OSV Bought Out?... Contacting the Censors... "From Peter to Petrifaction"... Truly a Messed-Up Country... The Evil Empire of Godless Condomism

That Mosquito on the Tuxedo

Neuhaus also made this pointed remark about me in that brief response: “I have no…

The Astronomical Cost of Priestesses In the Church of England

Any full-time Church of England clergyman who worked for at least five years prior to 1992 was entitled to compensation if he resigned over women's ordination.