Volume > Issue > Note List > Special Breeds & Lesser Breeds

Special Breeds & Lesser Breeds

For those of us who like to keep up on the details of what’s going on in the Anglican Communion, The Christian Challenge (TCC) is indispensable. We looked forward to receiving its report on the Episcopal Church’s August convention. Even though the issue (Jul.-Sept. 2003) arrived late, as usual, we weren’t disappointed. The issue had a 12-page story on that emotional extravaganza, plus lots of related stories.

Everyone knows the general outline of what happened. First, V. Gene Robinson, who divorced his wife and left his children and moved in with a “gay” man, got the approval of the convention to become a bishop. (If you’re wondering what the “V.” stands for, TCC tells you: “Vicky.” We kid you not.) Second, the blessing of same-sex unions, which have been performed for a long while by Episcopal priests and priestesses without official approval, got official approval.

But there are more devils — in the details. You may not know about them. According to the report:

One of the most interesting questions of the conference came from Christian Broadcasting Network reporter Wendy Griffith. If a divorced male bishop can live with a man to whom he was not married, what about a divorced straight male bishop living with a female lover? Or, she asked, is that only okay if you are gay?

“The Episcopal Church honors holy matrimony,” so that cleric’s situation would present “a significant problem,” [Presiding Bishop Frank] Griswold said.

Enjoyed reading this?

READ MORE! REGISTER TODAY

SUBSCRIBE

You May Also Enjoy

City of Confusion

Some say the demise of Anglicanism truly began in the 1530s when King Henry VIII "nationalized" the Catholic Church in England.

The Shaping of Anglican Spiritual Expression

Moor­man covers development of the Book of Common Prayer, the place of the English Bible in the Church, hymnody and its influence on worship, and more.

Dances With Wolves, Vatican Edition

The days of trusting what's going on deep behind the scenes in chanceries and in the Roman curia are over. Transparency is what's needed, not blind trust in some broken bureaucracy.