Volume > Issue > Note List > A New Springtime for Liberal Catholicism?

A New Springtime for Liberal Catholicism?

Is everything up for grabs?

As time marches on in the Age of Francis, this question, and all that it implies, has taken on greater and greater gravity.

A certain giddiness is detectable among those who believe that Francis could, at any moment, overturn ancient doctrines and practices. So far, this hasn’t happened, and there isn’t much hard evidence to suggest that it will. (The Pope’s ill manner of speaking, though supremely frustrating, doesn’t necessarily portend a plan of action.) But wishful thinking, once entertained, is hard to dismiss. And the liberal Catholic changeophiles are leaving no stone unturned in their quest to find something — anything — in the Church for Francis to reform, revise, or reject.

Case in point: an article by Fr. Donald Cozzens in Commonweal (Oct. 9), in which he argues that “it’s time to review the practice of attaching grave sin to missing Mass.”

Fr. Cozzens, recall, is the author of The Changing Face of the Priesthood (2000), a pre-sex-abuse-crisis book that caused considerable buzz at the time for stating that “the priesthood is or is becoming a gay profession.” (Cozzens estimated that the percentage of homosexuals in the priesthood back then ranged somewhere between twenty-three and fifty-eight percent — way out of proportion to their percentage in the general male population.)

Enjoyed reading this?

READ MORE! REGISTER TODAY

SUBSCRIBE

You May Also Enjoy

The Poor Misunderstood Pope?

While Pope Francis doesn't deny the truth or the faith, he implicitly calls some of it into question, not only by his call for a re-ordering of priorities, but through his uncertain and inexact language.

A "Climate of Fear" in the Vatican?

Bishop Schneider of Kazakhstan says in Rome today, churchmen "live in a climate of threats and of denial of dialogue towards a specific group" — that is, towards anyone not in lockstep with Francis's reform movement.

The Theological Blurriness of Cardinal Marx

German Cardinals Marx and Kasper have implied by their words and actions that national episcopal conferences can form their own doctrinal and pastoral policies apart from Rome and contrary to the Church's universal teaching.