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It’s Time to Wake Up

GUEST COLUMN

By Robert R. Allard | April 2006
Robert R. Allard, the Director of Apostles of Divine Mercy, writes from Port St. Lucie, Florida.

Este artículo: en español

Record-setting hurricanes, tsunamis, earthquakes, floods, and many other natural disasters are happening. Sin is increasing everywhere: pornography, homosexuality, adultery, fornication, and unborn babies being brutally murdered by the thousands daily. The signs of the End Times are multiplying, including the sign of many scoffers.

Unfortunately, many of the scoffers are sleeping clergy who have failed to see any urgency. Dwindling Mass attendance at already epidemic levels fails to be addressed by many priests and bishops who would rather close parishes than place any effort into getting fallen-away Catholics to return to the practice of the Faith. Sin is rarely mentioned, even on Easter when the churches are full of those living in mortal sin who have missed Sunday Mass and haven’t been to Confession in decades. How much longer are our leaders going to sleep while the souls charged to their care fall into Hell like raindrops?

It must offend our Lord greatly when churches are closed, especially while our priests and bishops fail to make any serious effort to get people to come back to Mass. Even in parishes that have been recently closed, you would always find standing-room-only crowds on Easter Sunday. It doesn’t take a genius to figure out that if those Easter-only Catholics would come back, those parishes would operate in the black.

If it is true that “where sin abounds, grace abounds all the more” (Rom. 5:20), then indeed with all the sin that is around today there should be an ocean of graces available. How and from where might all these graces come to us?

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