Volume > Issue > Note List > Free Will & Freedom of Choice

Free Will & Freedom of Choice

Nancy Pelosi is one politician known to pontificate on subjects that are “above her pay grade.”

She was at it again in the days leading up to Christmas. This time her pulpit was Newsweek magazine. In a December 21, 2009, interview, the Speaker of the House was asked about her “brushes with [Church] hierarchy,” to which she replied: “I have some concerns about the church’s position respecting a woman’s right to choose. I have some concerns about the church’s position on gay rights.” Frankly, she feels that the Church is wrong on these issues, and she is “concerned” that the Church isn’t going to modify her perennial teachings to conform to Pelosi’s political positions.

Despite what she perceives as the Church’s shortcomings, the Madam Speaker made haste to proclaim, “I am a practicing Catholic,” though she figures that “they’re probably not too happy about that.” Wrong again. No one in the Church hierarchy would ever claim to be unhappy that Nancy Pelosi is a Catholic; what makes Catholics uncomfortable is that she doesn’t vote with a well-formed Catholic conscience, but freely lets politics override ethical judgment. What’s worse — and what has brought on her “brushes” with the bishops — is her habit of misrepresenting Catholic theology in order to justify her rejection of Catholic morality. (For the background, see our New Oxford Notes “A Lesson From the Past,” Nov. 2008, and “Return Volley,” Apr. 2009.)

She did it again in her Newsweek interview: “I practically mourn this difference of opinion” with Church teaching on abortion and homosexuality, she said, “because I feel what I was raised to believe is consistent with what I profess, and that is that we are all endowed with a free will and a responsibility to answer for our actions. And that women should have that opportunity to exercise their free will.”

Enjoyed reading this?

READ MORE! REGISTER TODAY

SUBSCRIBE

You May Also Enjoy

Free Will & Freedom of Choice

Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi is one politician known to pontificate on subjects that are "above her pay grade."

The Example of Large Families

We need to re-think children — whose they are, why they exist, and whether anything else we can possibly choose is more important.

Subsidiarity of the Body

The subsidiarity of the body is a testament to the theology of the body; it says that the human body is a marvel fit to host the human soul.