Volume > Issue > Note List > Billy Graham's Crumbling Journalistic Legacy

Billy Graham’s Crumbling Journalistic Legacy

Christianity Today (CT) was founded by Billy Graham in 1956, and Graham is the Chairman of its Board of Directors. CT is without doubt America’s bellwether Evangelical magazine.

The October 4 CT offers a forum on homosexuality chaired by Richard Mouw, President of Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena. The panelists are Prof. David Jones of Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Prof. Stephen Spencer of Dallas Theological Seminary, and Prof. Mary Stewart Van Leeuwen of Eastern College in Pennsylvania. These folks are not marginal Evangelicals, and the institutions they’re affiliated with are highly regarded in the Evangelical world.

Now, guess what! All four participants agree that, in Mouw’s words, “there are no theological, biblical obstacles to advocating laws that permit the rights of domestic partners, from hospital visiting rights to sharing insurance plans and tax status,” which laws they all support.

Mouw raises the question of two lesbians who adopt a child. How should Evangelicals respond? Van Leeuwen says that such “unusual families always seem to work best if they attach themselves to a church…. We should help them….” She says, moreover, that practicing homosexuals should be encouraged to worship in Evangelical churches, adding that they should be informed that what’s important is that “we are together on the Nicene Creed,” even though “there are secondary principles on which we can and do legitimately disagree.”

Enjoyed reading this?

READ MORE! REGISTER TODAY

SUBSCRIBE

You May Also Enjoy

The Truth About the Homosexual Rights Movement

Ed. Note: Throughout 2017, in commemoration of our 40th year of publication, we are featuring…

A Manufactured Controversy

Those raising the most vocal objections to new diocesan teacher contracts -- which stipulate that teachers conduct themselves according to basic Catholic principles in their public lives -- are those who do not agree with many of the Church's teachings.

The Wanting Seed. By Anthony Burgess.

The book seemed absurd when it appeared in 1962. Sixty years later, lipstick-wearing men, sex changes, and overzealous population controllers are common.