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The Lady & the Fox

Now of all the Catholics that God had made, the Fox was the most liberal and progressive. One day he sidled up to the woman as she was preparing a religion class and he said, “Look at all the work you do. This parish would be nowhere without you, frankly. And yet they still won’t let a woman be a priest.”

And she said, “But the Church has no power to ordain women.”

And the Fox said, “Church! Who is Church? You are Church! And if you are Church, you have the power. If a woman can be a doctor or lawyer — surely she can be a priest.”

And the woman said, “I do sometimes think I might be good at it.”

“Of course you would be,” said the Fox. “You’re already doing a lot of the work — but without the status.”

The woman grimaced, “It’s no fun being condescended to by some awfully feeble excuses for men, who seem to think that wearing vestments makes them the next thing to God Almighty.”

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