Volume > Issue > The "Catholic" Politician of 2001 & The Southern "Gentleman" of 1860

The “Catholic” Politician of 2001 & The Southern “Gentleman” of 1860

IS THERE ANY DIFFERENCE?

By John L. Botti | October 2001
John L. Botti, a member of the Bar of the State of New York, is a retired associate professor of law at Seton Hall University in New Jersey.

No explanation is needed for what follows.

The “Catholic” Politician of 2001: “I am not in favor of abortion; indeed, personally I am opposed to it. But I do not feel it is my place to impose my convictions upon anyone else!”

The Southern “Gentleman” of 1860: “I am not in favor of slavery; indeed, personally I am opposed to it. But I do not feel it is my place to impose my convictions upon anyone else!”

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The “Catholic” Politician of 2001: “I am not pro-abortion! I am pro-choice! I favor leaving the decision up to the woman and the woman alone. It is her decision — and no one else’s.”

The Southern “Gentleman” of 1860: “I am not pro-slavery! I am pro-choice! I favor leaving the decision up to the slaveholder and to him alone. It is his decision — and no one else’s.”

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