Lay Holiness – Part XI

A few dozen laypersons moved along the canonization 'pipeline' in 2017 & 2018

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Faith

Pope Francis advanced more souls along the “pipeline” to canonization in 2017 and 2018. Let’s continue our systematic, chronological look at them:

  • Feb. 27, 2017: 8 people, including one martyr. Of the non-martyrs: four were priests (one of them a diocesan-founder) or religious, three of whom were founders. The two laypersons were Pedro Herrero Rubio (1904-1978) and Vittorio Trancanelli (1944-1998). The former was a pediatrician and was married (without children). The latter was also a physician, married, the father of two natural-born and seven adopted children.
  • March 23, 2017: 78 people, including 72 martyrs. Of the six non-martyrs, three were priests or religious of whom one was a founder. There were three laypersons: the Marto siblings of Fatima and Daniela Zanetta (1962-1986).
  • May 4, 2017: 12 people, including one martyr. Of the 11 non-martyrs: eight priests or religious, four of whom were founders. Of the four non-founders, two were cardinals. Three were lay people: Edvige Carboni (1880-1952) was a woman who was a “victim soul” and received the stigmata and visions. Alessandro Nottegar (1943-1986) was a medical doctor, married with children. Guadalupe Ortiz de Landázuri (1916-1975) was active in Opus Dei and taught chemistry.
  • July 7, 2017: 8 people; two of them martyrs. Of the non-martyrs, five were priests (or bishop) or religious; four of them founders. One layperson: Hanna Chrzanowska (1902-1973), a nurse.
  • Oct. 9, 2017: 9 people, two of whom were martyrs. Of the 7 non-martyrs, six were priests (one diocesan) or religious, three of whom were founders. The layperson, Francesco Paolo Gravina (1800-1854), was married but separated, and had no children. He served as a mayor of Palermo and founded a religious Order.
  • Nov. 8, 2017: 8 people including two martyrs. Of the six non-martyrs, five were priests (or pope) and three of these were founders. The sole layperson is Bernard II, Margrave (a royal title) of Baden (1428/29-1458).
  • Dec. 19, 2017: 27 people including 16 martyrs. Of the 11 non-martyrs, six were priests (one diocesan) (or cardinal) or religious; one of them was a founder. Isidoro Zorzano (1902-1943), a layman, was a member of Opus Dei.
  • Jan. 26, 2018: 25 people including 20 martyrs. Of the non-martyrs, all five were priests (one a diocesan founder) or religious and all five were founders.
  • March 7, 2018: 13 people including one martyr. Of the 12 non-martyrs, 10 were priests (or pope or archbishop) (one a diocesan priest) or religious; four of them founders. Two are lay: Maria Bordoni (1916-1978) founded a lay fraternity and Alessandra Sabattini (1961-1984) who was engaged to be married when she was killed in a car accident.
  • April 14, 2018: 8 people, none of them martyrs. All eight were priests (two of them diocesan founders) or religious; six of these were founders.
  • May 19, 2018: 12 people, none of them martyrs. All 12 were priests (one a diocesan founder) or religious; four of them (including a cardinal) were founders. There were no members of the laity.
  • June 8, 2018: 7 people, four of whom were martyrs. Of the three non-martyrs, all were lay: Nunzio Sulprizio (counted under July 19, 2018, below); Maria Guadalupe Ortiz de Landázuri y Fernández de Heredia, of Opus Dei (1916-1975); and Maria Concepcion Cabrera Arias de Armida (1862-1937), known as Conchita. A widow with nine children, she aspired to found five religious institutes but did not.
  • July 5, 2018: 4 people, none of them martyrs. All four were laypersons. Two of these were teenagers when they died. None were married: Pietro Di Vitale (1916-1940), a seminarian; Alexia González-Barros y González (1971-1985), a member of Opus Dei; Carlo Acutis (1991-2006), who catalogued Eucharistic Miracles and was beatified in October 2020; and Giorgio La Pira (1904-1977), two-time mayor of Florence, a member of the Third Order of St. Dominic. With respect to La Pira, see the letter of Pope St. John Paul II to the cardinal of Florence on the centenary of La Pira’s birth, Nov. 1, 2004, https://w2.vatican.va/content/john-paul-ii/en/letters/2004/documents/hf_jp-ii_let_20041101_archbishop-florence.html, and Deirdre Pirro, “Giorgio La Pira: The Monk-Like Mayor,” The Florentine, April 8, 2010, http://www.theflorentine.net/lifestyle/2010/04/giorgio-la-pira/ .
  • July 19, 2018: 7 people, one of them a martyr (Bishop Oscar Romero). Of the six non-martyrs, five were priests (or pope, in the case of Pope Paul VI) (two of them diocesan; one of the two was a founder) or religious. Of the five, three were founders. One of the non-martyrs was a diocesan priest. Another was a layperson: Nunzio Sulprizio, who died as a teenager (1817-1836).

 

***Editor’s Note: For Part X in this series, click here

 

James Thunder is a Washington, D.C., lawyer and author, with degrees from the University of Notre Dame, the University of Virginia, and Georgetown. He is former general counsel of Americans United for Life, and past grand knight in the Knights of Columbus.

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