The Theological Blurriness of Cardinal Marx

May 2015

Who is Reinhard Cardinal Marx — and why should we care?

Cardinal Marx is the archbishop of Munich and Freising. The only reason anyone outside of Germany has heard of him is because he is president of the German Bishops’ Conference, a position he’s used as a bully pulpit since his election to the post in March 2014.

Buoyed by what he perceives as Pope Francis’s reform-minded attitude toward the Church in general and toward marriage and family life in particular, Cardinal Marx has emerged as a leading critic of Gerhard Cardinal Müller, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, a post held by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger during most of John Paul II’s papacy.

Cardinal Marx made news around the world this February when he stated that the German bishops were unwilling to wait until the second session of the Synod on the Family, slated for this coming October, before moving ahead with the implementation of Walter Cardinal Kasper’s proposed pastoral plan to allow divorced-and-remarried Catholics to receive Holy Communion. (You guessed it: Kasper is German too.)

Both Kasper and Marx have implied by their words and actions that national episcopal conferences can form their own doctrinal and pastoral policies apart from Rome and contrary to the Church’s universal teaching. It sounds like they’ve spent a little too much time in Wittenberg.


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New Oxford Notes: May 2015

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What assurance does the Church have that divorced and remarried persons understand the sacredness of marriage.The price for witnessing a true marriage, the second time around, is annulment and the requisite period of celibacy, a time for profound discernment, a time to commune with God, a small price to pay for the sacred annointing. He did not say it would be easy, only that it is worth the sacrifice. Marriage does not stand alone. To divorce is to separate from Christ Himself. Annul first and return to the full embrace of Christ. Posted by: lilio31
July 08, 2015 12:58 PM EDT
This is a VERY informative article. Let's remember that the most prominent heretics in the church's history have been bishops or presbyters, e.g. Arius, Nestorius, Father Martin Luther, Father John Calvin. Current statistics tell us that more Catholics are leaving the Catholic church in the U.S.A. than are people entering it. Whether it's in Germany or the U.S.A., if the shepherds are astray, do we wonder why the lambs and sheep are confused? Read the 2nd chapter of the First Letter of John. Posted by: Norbert Kieferle
May 13, 2015 11:12 AM EDT
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